Definition of tree noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

tree

 noun
noun
BrE BrE//triː//
 
; NAmE NAmE//triː//
 
Plants
 
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  • a tall plant that can live a long time. Trees have a thick central wooden trunk from which branches grow, usually with leaves on them an oak tree to plant a tree to chop/cut down a tree They followed a path through the trees. CollocationsThe living worldAnimals animals mate/​breed/​reproduce/​feed (on something) fish/​amphibians swim/​spawn (= lay eggs) birds fly/​migrate/​nest/​sing insects crawl/​fly/​bite/​sting insects/​bees/​locusts swarm bees collect/​gather nectar/​pollen spiders spin/​weave a web snakes/​lizards shed their skins bears/​hedgehogs/​frogs hibernate insect larvae grow/​develop/​pupate an egg/​a chick/​a larva hatches attract/​find/​choose a mate produce/​release eggs/​sperm lay/​fertilize/​incubate/​hatch eggs inhabit a forest/​a reef/​the coast mark/​enter/​defend (a) territory stalk/​hunt/​capture/​catch/​kill preyPlants and fungi trees/​plants grow/​bloom/​blossom/​flower a seed germinates/​sprouts leaves/​buds/​roots/​shoots appear/​develop/​form flower buds swell/​open a fungus grows/​spreads/​colonizes something pollinate/​fertilize a flower/​plant produce/​release/​spread/​disperse pollen/​seeds/​spores produce/​bear fruit develop/​grow/​form roots/​shoots/​leaves provide/​supply/​absorb/​extract/​release nutrients perform/​increase/​reduce photosynthesisBacteria and viruses bacteria/​microbes/​viruses grow/​spread/​multiply bacteria/​microbes live/​thrive in/​on something bacteria/​microbes/​viruses evolve/​colonize something/​cause disease bacteria break something down/​convert something (into something) a virus enters/​invades something/​the body a virus mutates/​evolves/​replicates (itself) be infected with/​contaminated with/​exposed to a new strain of a virus/​drug-resistant bacteria contain/​carry/​harbour (especially US English) harbor bacteria/​a virus kill/​destroy/​eliminate harmful/​deadly bacteria compare bush, shrub see also bay tree, Christmas tree, family tree, gum tree, plane tree See related entries: Plants
  • Word Origin Old English trēow, trēo: from a Germanic variant of an Indo-European root shared by Greek doru ‘wood, spear’, drus ‘oak’.Extra examples A fallen tree was blocking the road. An enormous oak tree stands at the entrance to the school. He bought tools and seeds with the aim of setting up a tree nursery. It was a small town of dust lanes and wide shade trees. Palm trees line the broad avenue. Protesters formed a human blockade to stop loggers felling trees. The cat got stuck up a tree. The floods left a tide of mud and uprooted trees. The forest can be dated by studying tree rings. The tree belt around the fields acts as a windbreak. The tree produces tiny white blossoms. Tree cover would prevent further soil erosion. Trees swayed gently in the breeze. We sat beneath a shady tree. We sat under a tree, in the shade. a bird in a tree a gnarled old apple tree dappled shafts of light which struggled through the tree canopy fruit on a tree tree damage caused by acid rainIdioms
    the apple doesn’t fall/never falls far from the tree
     
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    (saying, especially North American English) a child usually behaves in a similar way to his or her parent(s)
    in the highest position or rank in a profession or career
    be barking up the wrong tree
     
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    (informal) to have the wrong idea about how to get or achieve something You're barking up the wrong tree if you're expecting us to lend you any money.
    (informal) to be behaving in a crazy or stupid way, perhaps because of drugs or alcohol See related entries: Describing strange traits, Plants
    it/money doesn’t grow on trees
     
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    (saying) used to tell somebody not to use something or spend money carelessly because you do not have a lot of it
    not see the forest for the trees(North American English)(British English not see the wood for the trees)
     
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    to not see or understand the main point about something, because you are paying too much attention to small details
    not see the wood for the trees(British English)(North American English not see the forest for the trees)
     
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    to not see or understand the main point about something, because you are paying too much attention to small details
    See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: tree