English

Definition of true adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    true

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//truː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//truː//
     
    (truer, truest)
     
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    correct
  1. 1  connected with facts rather than things that have been invented or guessed Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Is it true she's leaving? Can you prove that what you say is true? All the rumours turned out to be true. I think it would be true to say that the show was a success. That's not strictly (= completely) true. The novel is based on a true story. His excuse just doesn't ring (= sound) true. Unfortunately, these findings do not hold true (= are not valid) for women and children. The music is dull and uninspiring, and the same is true of the acting. You never spoke a truer word (= used to emphasize that you agree with what somebody has just said). opposite untrue Synonymstrueright correct These words all describe something that cannot be doubted as fact and includes no mistakes.true connected with facts rather than things that have been invented or guessed:Are the following statements true or false? Is it true (that) she’s leaving?right that is true and cannot be doubted as a fact:I got about half the answers right. What’s the right time?correct right according to the facts and without any mistakes:Only one of the answers is correct. Check that all the details are correct.right or correct? Correct is more formal than right and is more likely to be used in official or formal instructions or documents.Patterns right/​correct about somebody/​something the true/​right/​correct answer the right/​correct time
  2. real
  3. 2  real or exact, especially when this is different from how something seems the true face of war (= what it is really like rather than what people think it is like) The true cost of these experiments to the environment will not be known for years to come. He reveals his true character to very few people.
  4. 3  [usually before noun] having the qualities or characteristics of the thing mentioned It was true love between them. He's a true gentleman. The painting is a masterpiece in the truest sense of the word. He is credited with inventing the first true helicopter.
  5. admitting fact
  6. 4  used to admit that a particular fact or statement is correct, although you think that something else is more important It's true that he could do the job, but would he fit in with the rest of the team? ‘We could get it cheaper.’ ‘True, but would it be as good?’ Language BankneverthelessConceding a point and making a counter-argument While the film is undoubtedly too long, it is nevertheless an intriguing piece of cinema. It can be argued that the movie is too long. It is nonetheless an intriguing piece of cinema. The film is undoubtedly too long. Still, it is an intriguing piece of cinema. Of course, huge chunks of the book have been sacrificed in order to make a two-hour movie, but it is nevertheless a successful piece of storytelling. Critics are wrong to argue that the film’s plot is too complicated. Certainly there are a couple of major twists, but audiences will have no difficulty following them. It is true that you cannot make a good movie without a good script, but it is equally true that a talented director can make a good script into an excellent film. It remains to be seen whether these two movies herald a new era of westerns, but there is no doubt that they represent welcome additions to the genre.
  7. loyal
  8. 5showing respect and support for a particular person or belief in a way that does not change, even in different situations a true friend true to somebody/something She has always been true to herself (= done what she thought was good, right, etc.). He was true to his word (= did what he promised to do). Many were executed for remaining true to their principles. Knights swore to be true to their lord.
  9. accurate
  10. 6true (to something) being an accurate version or copy of something The movie is not true to the book. The painting is a true likeness of her.
  11. 7[not usually before noun] (old-fashioned or literary) straight and accurate His aim was true (= he hit the target).
  12. Word Familytrue adjective (untrue)truth nountruthful adjective (untruthful)truthfully adverbtruly adverb Word Origin Old English trēowe, trȳwe ‘steadfast, loyal’; related to Dutch getrouw, German treu, also to truce.Extra examples All her wishes came true. He has stayed true to his word. He was true to his word, and turned up on time. Her explanation doesn’t ring quite true. I have never felt more true to myself. It is literally true that I never heard of him until I was in my late twenties. It was like a dream come true. It’s hardly true to call cleaning windows a ‘profession’. It’s perfectly true that I didn’t help much, but I was busy. She stayed true to her principles. That is undoubtedly true. That’s not strictly true, I’m afraid. The story is more or less true. This degree of inequality was by no means true of all 19th-century marriages. This is in fact true in most situations. This is particularly true of older women. This principle holds true for all states. We hope that this will prove true. What applies at a local level holds doubly true at a national level. What is true for buyers is equally true for sellers. While technically true, this is unfair. While this is certainly true for some, it is not the case for others. ‘We could get it cheaper.’ ‘True, but would it be as good?’ He’s a true gentleman. His excuse just doesn’t ring true. I think it would be true to say that the show was a success. Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Is it true (that) she’s leaving? Is it your wish that I should sign these minutes as a true record of that meeting? It’s true that he could do the job, but would he fit in with the rest of the team? Many were executed for remaining true to their principles. She is not the true owner of this house. That’s not strictly true. The article isn’t at all true to what I actually said. The movie isn’t really true to the book. The music is dull and uninspiring and the same is true of the acting. The novel is based on a true story. The true cost of these experiments to the environment will not be known for years to come. This account is now accepted as a true reflection of what actually happened. Through that difficult period he proved to be a true friend. True to her prediction , it began snowing later that day. Unfortunately, these findings do not hold true for women and children. You never spoke a truer word. the true face of socialismIdioms  (of a hope, wish, etc.) to become reality Winning the medal was like a dream come true. to give the impression of being sincere/true or not sincere/true It may seem a strange story but it rings true to me. used to say that you cannot believe that something is as good as it seems ‘I'm afraid you were quoted the wrong price.’ ‘I thought it was too good to be true.’
    tried and tested/trusted (British English) (North American English tried and true)
     
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    that you have used or relied on in the past successfully a tried and tested method for solving the problem More Like This Alliteration in idioms belt and braces, black and blue, born and bred, chalk and cheese, chop and change, done and dusted, down and dirty, in dribs and drabs, eat somebody out of house and home, facts and figures, fast and furious, first and foremost, forgive and forget, hale and hearty, hem and haw, kith and kin, mix and match, part and parcel, puff and pant, to rack and ruin, rant and rave, risk life and limb, short and sweet, signed and sealed, spic and span, through thick and thin, this and that, top and tail, tried and tested, wax and waneSee worksheet.
    (often disapproving) your real character, rather than the one that you usually allow other people to see It was only after they got married that he showed himself in his true colours. used to say that somebody is behaving in the way that you expect them to behave, especially when this is annoying True to form, she managed to upset everyone before leaving. (of a book, film/movie, etc.) seeming real rather than invented I don’t think the characters are very true to life.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: true