Definition of tuition noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    tuition

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//tjuˈɪʃn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tuˈɪʃn//
     
    [uncountable] Teaching and learning
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1tuition (in something) (formal) the act of teaching something, especially to one person or to people in small groups She received private tuition in French. The course involves six hours of individual tuition per week. I studied dance for two years under her expert tuition. CollocationsEducationLearning acquire/​get/​lack (an) education/​training/(British English) (some) qualifications receive/​provide somebody with training/​tuition develop/​design/​plan a curriculum/(especially British English) course/(North American English) program/​syllabus give/​go to/​attend a class/​lesson/​lecture/​seminar hold/​run/​conduct a class/​seminar/​workshop sign up for/​take a course/​classes/​lessonsSchool go to/​start preschool/​kindergarten/​nursery school be in the first, second, etc. (North American English) grade/(especially British English) year (at school) study/​take/​drop history/​chemistry/​German, etc. (British English) leave/​finish/​drop out of/ (North American English) quit school (North American English) graduate high school/​collegeProblems at school be the victim/​target of bullying (British English) play truant from/ (both British English, informal) bunk off/​skive off school (= not go to school when you should) (both especially North American English) skip/​cut class/​school (British English) cheat in/(North American English) cheat on an exam/​a test get/​be given a detention (for doing something) be expelled from/​be suspended from schoolWork and exams do your homework/(British English) revision/​a project on something work on/​write/​do/​submit an essay/​a dissertation/​a thesis/​an assignment/(North American English) a paper finish/​complete your dissertation/​thesis/​studies/​coursework hand in/ (North American English) turn in your homework/​essay/​assignment/​paper study/​prepare/ (British English) revise/ (North American English) review/ (North American English, informal) cram for a test/​an exam take/ (both British English) do/​sit a test/​an exam (especially British English) mark/ (especially North American English) grade homework/​a test (British English) do well in/ (North American English) do well on/ (informal, especially North American English) ace a test/​an exam pass/​fail/ (informal, especially North American English) flunk a test/​an exam/​a class/​a course/​a subjectUniversity apply to/​get into/​go to/​start college/(British English) university leave/​graduate from law school/​college/(British English) university (with a degree in computer science) study for/​take/ (British English) do/​complete a law degree/​a degree in physics (both North American English) major/​minor in biology/​philosophy earn/​receive/​be awarded/​get/​have/​hold a master’s degree/​a bachelor’s degree/​a PhD in economics See related entries: Teaching and learning
  2. 2(also tuition fees [plural]) the money that you pay to be taught, especially in a college or university
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘custody, care’): via Old French from Latin tuitio(n-), from tueri ‘to watch, guard’. Current senses date from the late 16th cent.Extra examples He won’t be able to finish his education unless someone pays his tuition. How can we make college tuition affordable for everyone? She had become expert in Chinese cooking under the tuition of her aunt. The foreign students receive free tuition and accommodation. The program includes about $5 000 in tuition assistance. The students get expert tuition in small groups. They pay full tuition. extra tuition for the exams the controversy over university tuition fees tuition for beginners tuition in Italian I received basic tuition in French and mathematics, but not much more. Most of the parents are prepared to pay extra for private tuition for their children. One-to-one tuition can be arranged in certain languages. The ending of free tuition in universities means that fewer mature students are studying for degrees. The price includes two weeks’ horse riding plus expert tuition. The scholarship pays the tuition fees but students still need to find money for accommodation, meals and books. There was a further week of intensive tuition at the management training centre.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: tuition