Definition of value verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    value

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuː//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they value
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuː//
     
    he / she / it values
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuːz//
     
    past simple valued
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuːd//
     
    past participle valued
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuːd//
     
    -ing form valuing
    BrE BrE//ˈvæljuːɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvæljuːɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
    consider important
  1. 1  (not used in the progressive tenses) to think that somebody/something is important value somebody/something (as something) I really value him as a friend. value somebody/something (for something) The area is valued for its vineyards. a valued member of staff They don’t seem to value honesty very highly.
  2. decide worth
  3. 2  [usually passive] value something (at something) to decide that something is worth a particular amount of money The property has been valued at over $2 million.
  4. Word Familyvalue noun verbvaluable adjectiveinvaluable adjective (valueless)valuables noun Word Origin Middle English: from Old French, feminine past participle of valoir ‘be worth’, from Latin valere.Extra examples During my illness I learned to value the ordinary things in life. He hated to be valued for his looks alone. Housework is negatively valued as a retreat from a disliked alternative—employment work. I value her very highly as a friend. The company has recently been valued at $6 billion. Tulips are valued for their beauty. learning to value the ordinary things in life one of the most socially valued roles in contemporary society—being a parent the fear of losing the independence that they rightly value I took my violin into the shop to get it valued. She’s a valued member of staff. They don’t seem to value honesty very highly. They hold back through fear of losing the independence that they rightly value.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: value