Definition of vibrate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

vibrate

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪt//
 
; NAmE usually NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪt//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪt//
 
[intransitive, transitive]Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they vibrate
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪt//
 
; NAmE usually NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪt//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪt//
 
he / she / it vibrates
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪts//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪts//
 
past simple vibrated
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪtɪd//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪd//
 
past participle vibrated
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪtɪd//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪd//
 
-ing form vibrating
BrE BrE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈvaɪbreɪtɪŋ//
 
, NAmE//vaɪˈbreɪtɪŋ//
 
 
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to move or make something move from side to side very quickly and with small movements vibrate (something) Every time a train went past the walls vibrated. vibrate with something The atmosphere seemed to vibrate with tension. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘give out light or sound as if by vibration’): from Latin vibrat- ‘moved to and fro’, from the verb vibrare ‘vibrate’.Extra examples The thuds vibrated through the car. The ground beneath their feet began to vibrate. The male spider will vibrate one of the threads of the female spider’s web. The sound of the gong was still vibrating in the air. The walls seemed to vibrate with the deafening music from upstairs.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: vibrate