English

Definition of vow noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

vow

 noun
noun
BrE BrE//vaʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//vaʊ//
 
Marriage
 
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a formal and serious promise, especially a religious one, to do something to make/take a vow to break/keep a vow to break your marriage vows Nuns take a vow of chastity. CollocationsMarriage and divorceRomance fall/​be (madly/​deeply/​hopelessly) in love (with somebody) be/​believe in/​fall in love at first sight be/​find true love/​the love of your life suffer (from) (the pains/​pangs of) unrequited love have/​feel/​show/​express great/​deep/​genuine affection for somebody/​something meet/​marry your husband/​wife/​partner/​fiancé/fiancée/​boyfriend/​girlfriend have/​go on a (blind) date be going out with/(especially North American English) dating a guy/​girl/​boy/​man/​woman move in with/​live with your boyfriend/​girlfriend/​partnerWeddings get/​be engaged/​married/​divorced arrange/​plan a wedding have a big wedding/​a honeymoon/​a happy marriage have/​enter into an arranged marriage call off/​cancel/​postpone your wedding invite somebody to/​go to/​attend a wedding/​a wedding ceremony/​a wedding reception conduct/​perform a wedding ceremony exchange rings/​wedding vows/​marriage vows congratulate/​toast/​raise a glass to the happy couple be/​go on honeymoon (with your wife/​husband) celebrate your first (wedding) anniversarySeparation and divorce be unfaithful to/(informal) cheat on your husband/​wife/​partner/​fiancé/fiancée/​boyfriend/​girlfriend have an affair (with somebody) break off/​end an engagement/​a relationship break up with/​split up with/ (informal) dump your boyfriend/​girlfriend separate from/​be separated from/​leave/​divorce your husband/​wife annul/​dissolve a marriage apply for/​ask for/​go through/​get a divorce get/​gain/​be awarded/​have/​lose custody of the children pay alimony/​child support (to your ex-wife/​husband) See related entries: Marriage Word Origin Middle English: from Old French vou, from Latin votum ‘a vow, wish’, from vovere ‘to vow’; the verb is from Old French vouer.Extra examples He took a lifelong vow of celibacy. Nothing will persuade me to break this vow. She decided to leave the convent before taking her final vows. She kept her vow of silence until she died. The couple exchanged vows at the altar. a vow of poverty As a priest he had taken a vow of celibacy. She made a vow never to speak to him again. She would not be unfaithful to her marriage vows. The monks take a vow of silence.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: vow

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