English

Definition of warrant verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

warrant

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrənt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrənt//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrənt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they warrant
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrənt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrənt//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrənt//
 
he / she / it warrants
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrənts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrənts//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrənts//
 
past simple warranted
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrəntɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrəntɪd//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrəntɪd//
 
past participle warranted
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrəntɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrəntɪd//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrəntɪd//
 
-ing form warranting
BrE BrE//ˈwɒrəntɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɔːrəntɪŋ//
 
, NAmE//ˈwɑːrəntɪŋ//
 
 
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  • (formal) to make something necessary or appropriate in a particular situation synonym justify warrant something Further investigation is clearly warranted. The TV appearance was so brief that it hardly warranted comment. They do not consider the case serious enough to warrant a government enquiry. warrant (somebody/something) doing something The situation scarcely warrants their/them being dismissed. see also unwarranted
  • Word Origin Middle English (in the senses ‘protector’ and ‘safeguard’, also, as a verb, ‘keep safe from danger’): from variants of Old French guarant (noun), guarantir (verb), of Germanic origin; compare with guarantee.Idioms (old-fashioned) used to tell somebody that you are sure of something and that they can be sure of it too
    See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: warrant