English

Definition of wheel verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    wheel

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//wiːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//wiːl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they wheel
    BrE BrE//wiːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//wiːl//
     
    he / she / it wheels
    BrE BrE//wiːlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//wiːlz//
     
    past simple wheeled
    BrE BrE//wiːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//wiːld//
     
    past participle wheeled
    BrE BrE//wiːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//wiːld//
     
    -ing form wheeling
    BrE BrE//ˈwiːlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwiːlɪŋ//
     
     
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    move something with wheels
  1. 1[transitive] wheel something (+ adv./prep.) to push or pull something that has wheels She wheeled her bicycle across the road.
  2. 2[transitive] wheel somebody/something (+ adv./prep.) to move somebody/something that is in or on something that has wheels The nurse wheeled him along the corridor.
  3. move in circle
  4. 3[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to move or fly in a circle Birds wheeled above us in the sky.
  5. turn quickly
  6. 4[intransitive, transitive] to turn quickly or suddenly and face the opposite direction; to make somebody/something do this (+ adv./prep.) She wheeled around and started running. Jim wheeled back to face me. wheel somebody/something (+ adv./prep.) He wheeled his horse back to the gate. He wheeled his horse around.
  7. Word Origin Old English hwēol (noun), of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit cakra ‘wheel, circle’ and Greek kuklos ‘circle’.Idioms (usually used in the progressive tenses) to do a lot of complicated deals in business or politics, often in a dishonest way More Like This Rhyming pairs in idioms doom and gloom, fair and square, high and dry, huff and puff, name and shame, slice and dice, thrills and spills, wear and tear, wheel and deal, wine and dineSee worksheet. Phrasal Verbswheel somethingout
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: wheel