Definition of worry verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    worry

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌri//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːri//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they worry
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌri//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːri//
     
    he / she / it worries
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌriz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːriz//
     
    past simple worried
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌrid//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːrid//
     
    past participle worried
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌrid//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːrid//
     
    -ing form worrying
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌriɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːriɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive] to keep thinking about unpleasant things that might happen or about problems that you have Don't worry. We have plenty of time. worry about somebody/something Don't worry about me. I'll be all right. He's always worrying about his weight. worry over somebody/something There's no point in worrying over things you can't change. worry (that)… I worry that I won't get into college.
  2. 2  [transitive] to make somebody/yourself anxious about somebody/something worry somebody/yourself (about somebody/something) What worries me is how I am going to get another job. worry somebody/yourself + adj. (about somebody/something) He's worried himself sick (= become extremely anxious) about his daughter. it worries somebody that… It worries me that he hasn't come home yet. it worries somebody to do something It worried me to think what might happen.
  3. 3  [transitive] to annoy or disturb somebody worry somebody The noise never seems to worry her. worry somebody with something Don't keep worrying him with a lot of silly questions.
  4. 4[transitive] worry something (of a dog) to attack animals, especially sheep, by chasing and/or biting them
  5. Word Origin Old English wyrgan ‘strangle’, of West Germanic origin. In Middle English the original sense of the verb gave rise to the meaning ‘seize by the throat and tear’, later figuratively ‘harass’, which led to the sense ‘cause anxiety to’ (early 19th century, the date also of the noun).Extra examples Don’t bother Harry—he has enough to worry about as it is. Don’t let it worry you unduly. Don’t worry about me, I’ll be fine. Don’t worry the driver with unnecessary requests. Don’t worry too much about it. I can’t help worrying about the future. She worries a lot about crime. Stop worrying, Dad, we’ll be fine. We can’t help worrying for your safety. What really worries me is what we do if there’s nobody there. You do worry unnecessarily, you know. He’s worried himself sick about his daughter. I worry that I won’t get into college. What worries me is how I’m going to get another job. You worry too much.Idioms (informal, especially British English) it is not important; it does not matter Not to worry—I can soon fix it. Not to worry—no harm done. Phrasal Verbsworry at something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: worry