English

Definition of worry noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    worry

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈwʌri//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɜːri//
     
    (pl. worries)
     
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  1. 1  [uncountable] the state of worrying about something synonym anxiety The threat of losing their jobs is a constant source of worry to them. A heart attack can be brought on by stress and worry. to be frantic with worry
  2. 2  [countable] something that worries you family/financial worries worry (about/over something) worries about the future worry (for/to somebody) Mugging is a real worry for many old people. My only worry is that… The news of his release from prison added further to her worries. Students should discuss any problems or worries they have with their course tutors.
  3. Word Origin Old English wyrgan ‘strangle’, of West Germanic origin. In Middle English the original sense of the verb gave rise to the meaning ‘seize by the throat and tear’, later figuratively ‘harass’, which led to the sense ‘cause anxiety to’ (early 19th century, the date also of the noun).Extra examples For years, the government has dismissed our worries as unfounded. He was sick with worry about everything. Her mother’s poor health caused her considerable worry. His mother’s health is an enormous worry to him. I didn’t know where he was and I was frantic with worry. I had a nagging worry that we weren’t going to get there. It was a relief to share my secret worries with him. Money is a constant source of worry. Most of Nigel’s worries proved groundless. My greatest worry is that he’ll do something stupid. My immediate worry is money. No worries—there’s plenty of time. Paying the mortgage is a big worry for many people. She gave her parents unnecessary worry when she forgot to call them. She wanted to enjoy her retirement without being beset by financial worries. Take the worry out of flying with our travel insurance offer. That year he had major health worries. The dollar has fallen to a new low amid worries that the American economy is heading for trouble. The earth tremors prompted worries of a second major earthquake. The fact that she heard nothing from him only increased her worry. The money side of things has been a constant worry. The staff all work very hard—we’ve got no worries on that account. There is no immediate cause for worry. These worries plagued him constantly. They will not have worries over money. Try and forget your worries for a little while. When he lost his job, the size of his flat was the least of his worries. He claims the illness was caused by stress and worry. financial/​family worriesIdioms (informal) it’s not a problem; it’s all right (often used as a reply when somebody thanks you for something)
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: worry